Jump to content

Recommended Posts

That sort of idea only really works if people didn't, I dunno, STEAL mobile phones. If this comes to pass, it is very possible that attackers could gain more access with far less work. Honestly, the whole thing reminds me of that whole, "Call this person to unlock your front door" idea that I'm sure was passed around years back. I even found it again, in a Cracked article of all places. It's called KISI; https://www.getkisi.com/

Nowadays it seems to be used for keyless entry in workplaces, but for a time the idea of using an app to let anyone open your front door without a key was tossed around;

Quote

Kisi works like this: if you live in an apartment block with an intercom, you insert a small chip into the intercom, on the door to your apartment itself you fix a digital lock, and finally you plug in the control unit inside your apartment.

Download the app, and hey presto you're ready to go. When you get to the door, you simply push a button on your phone, which sends a signal to the control unit or gateway in your apartment, which then tells the lock to open.

(Quote Sourced from BBC Article on KISI: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-22372102)

The founder, Maximilian Schuetz, even noted that you could, "be in Bermuda and give someone access in New York". Or in other words, give any person access to YOUR front door from anywhere in the world. Without actually being able to verify who is really there. So...yeah.

Same kind of issue here as with Microsoft's "Who Needs Passwords?" concept. It's an idea that only works if you're able to keep your phone secure and on you at all possible times. Lose your phone? You're locked out of your house and computer, respectively. Someone steals your phone, as people do? Well now they have potential access to both, on the spot. Good idea on paper, horrible in execution and only makes you (well, your phone) a bigger target.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 153
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I have never understood why people like Apple products. They do less, cost more, work worse and belong to a company of all-controlling meglomaniacs. Oh yes, and they removed the headphone port from th

I think having the headphone jack should still be a part of the phone. I know a lot of new technology is bluetooth compatible now and the risk of a crossover between paired devices is now almost nonex

The FCC did it, I don't like it, and... Killing Net Neutrality Has Brought On a New Call for Public Broadband That article referenced this one (which is also worth reading): What Will a

Posted Images

On 5/7/2018 at 6:18 PM, TheRedStranger said:

You have the education in this. I am sure you have already thought of several ways this could be exploited. To stop hackers, you must know how they operate. Obviously, one I can gather as a layman, would be if you have your phone acessibke to some one close to you - that means they can get in to your personal computer. Hacking will be merely redirected to getting access via mobile devices. 

Several came to mind while I was reading the second article. And you are correct; the hacking will just be directed at a different (and more vulnerable) target.

On 5/8/2018 at 6:22 PM, WarTraveller said:

That sort of idea only really works if people didn't, I dunno, STEAL mobile phones. If this comes to pass, it is very possible that attackers could gain more access with far less work. Honestly, the whole thing reminds me of that whole, "Call this person to unlock your front door" idea that I'm sure was passed around years back. I even found it again, in a Cracked article of all places. It's called KISI; https://www.getkisi.com/

Nowadays it seems to be used for keyless entry in workplaces, but for a time the idea of using an app to let anyone open your front door without a key was tossed around;

The founder, Maximilian Schuetz, even noted that you could, "be in Bermuda and give someone access in New York". Or in other words, give any person access to YOUR front door from anywhere in the world. Without actually being able to verify who is really there. So...yeah.

Same kind of issue here as with Microsoft's "Who Needs Passwords?" concept. It's an idea that only works if you're able to keep your phone secure and on you at all possible times. Lose your phone? You're locked out of your house and computer, respectively. Someone steals your phone, as people do? Well now they have potential access to both, on the spot. Good idea on paper, horrible in execution and only makes you (well, your phone) a bigger target.

Yeah, how many people even bother to secure their phones with any form of authentication to begin with? I have a PIN set on mine, but most people don't even do that because that makes it less convenient to check the phone. So, if the phone gets stolen, the thief has immediate access to its data. Sure, there's now such a thing as "secure selfie" authentication, but you have to download an app & know how to use it. And just how secure is it anyway? (Still doing research on that.) Samsung Galaxy 8 & 9 have facial recognition capabilities, but facial recognition isn’t as secure as Samsung wants you to think.

They don't even have to steal the phone if Bluetooth or NFC is enabled on it, but that's a different issue.

IMHO, Amazon Key is KISI all over again :P

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...
On 6/29/2018 at 3:45 PM, MoKat said:

News of the Exactis breach is all over the Internet, and for good reason - it's bigger than the Yahoo! breach.

Massive Breach at Data Broker Exactis Exposes Millions of Americans

Exactis breach exposes 340M records, may compel GDPR-like reg in U.S.

That’s a pretty unnerving thought that brings up a pressing issue...Honestly, Cybercrime and how to fight it deserves its own thread in the dialogue section. Its worth its own topic.

———

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/07/16/ctrl-labss-neural-tech-lets-humans-control-machines-with-their-brains.html?__source=yahoo|finance|headline|story|&par=yahoo&yptr=yahoo

Found this to be pretty intriguing. Makes you wonder if the traditional PC Mouse will even be widely around in 2030. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/20/2018 at 6:21 AM, TheRedStranger said:

Honestly, Cybercrime and how to fight it deserves its own thread in the dialogue section. Its worth its own topic.

 

I agree (that's a good idea), but where would breaking news about cybercrime belong?

And neural tech has been in the works for quite some time, but that looks rather promising. Smartphones & tablets are already mouse-less, so that wouldn't surprise me ;)

{edit: I saw this article today:

Amazon AI misidentifies Congress as criminals, proves it's not ready for enterprise

How can they be so sure those members of Congress were misidentified by the AI?? :D

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...
On 11/7/2018 at 2:01 PM, MoKat said:

Intel has announced a 48-core CPU for data centers: Tech Republic attempts to explain why we should care. No word on if whether or not it may be vulnerable to Spectre or Meltdown though.

So - what do you think is going to happen when we reach 1nm circuitry, or when Moore’s Law outpaces the capacity of the hardware materials we currently use? Will the exponential growth in electronics stop? Or will we migrate to a new form of computing (like quantum) that can carry on that equivalent growth rate?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we will migrate to a new form of computing before then, given the vulnerabilities in current chip designs and how hard researchers are working on quantum computing. According to the University of Waterloo, the main hurdle is finding a way to get qubits behave the way we want them to without falling out of their quantum state. I don't even have a good guess about how long that could take, so WarTraveller could be right.

{Edit: just found this article, which seems relevant:}

Playing Games with Quantum Computers

{2nd edit: found a video that was interesting & relevant - Are Computers Still Getting Faster?}

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Because this is about Reddit, I'm posting it here instead of in the Cybersecurity thread:

Reddit confirms $300M Series D led by China’s Tencent at $3B value

Naturally, Chris Chapel (China Uncensored) had a few things to say about that:

China Wants Reddit, and So Much More

So, do you all think Chris is correct about Tencent's motive for investing in Reddit?

Link to post
Share on other sites

The past several days people have been posting about Tienmenn Square and several other things about China that they don't want to know about on reddit.

 

You have millions of users from around the world (me included) with the knowledge that can be obtained in the internet. Either two things will happen:

  • Reddit runs the way it has because you can't silence millions of users from all over the world. Sure they will try to censor stuff but good luck hiding that.
  • A new site that's in the same vein as reddit gets made and everyone migrates over there. That's what happened to Digg... though it was Digg's fault they drove people away.
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Seems like everybody under the sun is trying to develop a self-driving car:

TomTom steers toward progress with autonomous test vehicle

Quote

On Thursday, Dutch location technology specialist TomTom announced updates to its latest autonomous test vehicle. The self-driving car will be used to test the latest technologies associated with TomTom's HD mapping services and improve autonomous driving functionality. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

No kidding. Welcome to the world of Deepfakes >.<

A quick search on "face-swapping apps" spit out 5 pages worth of links, including a few to the "app shutdown notice" for the Microsoft Face Swap app. Kinda shows how disturbingly popular these apps have gotten.

*makes a note to look for research about identifying deepfakes*

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...
  • 2 months later...

Well, people who have been reluctant to use tele-medicine in the past are far more likely to use it now ;) Maybe rural areas will finally get decent broadband service due to it becoming more necessary. As for online learning, this could force a much needed overhaul of our education system. Learning online can allow students to learn at their own pace. However, there are kids living in poverty who rely on the school lunch program, so if education goes completely online they'd have to get food some other way. While the schools here have been closed this month, cafeteria workers & bus drivers have been making & delivering breakfast/lunch to kids in need.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
On 4/22/2020 at 3:21 PM, MoKat said:

so if education goes completely online they'd have to get food some other way. While the schools here have been closed this month, cafeteria workers & bus drivers have been making & delivering breakfast/lunch to kids in need

I believe in this model. I got to see the food they gave too. It was nutritionally reasonable choices, ones made by informed decision makers (probably better than many apathetic or simply food-uneducated parents).  I think these  current ad-Hoc services are far wiser than food stamps as they are less tradable. They could be a promising frontier. Healthy lunches for children expire and thus are less reusable as a tradable currency. Kentucky has had a problem for example with “pop trains” where people in Appalachia sell pop (which is a sugary teeth-rotting junk-food that should never be subsidized to begin with) in exchange for money. These stacks of sodas are bought with food stamps to turn this specific welfare stipend meant for families into liquid wealth, all for more ignominious purposes, like recreational drugs.  That in the long term takes tax money (money coerced from successful, productive members of a society) meant for children, only to be used in a way that damages the economy, distorts natural markets, and feeds currently untaxed black markets, all the while leeching money that would have been invested organically in more optimal economic sectors, all the while creating a cultural pathology of dependency rather than social mobility in the poor. Ironically, this makes welfare a vector for feudalistic levels of inequality, at the expense of the most invested of our society. Elon Musk should have his money go to Space X to bring America to the starts, not Buba-Jay’s OxyContin and Paul Malls.  If we could reduce the large transportation costs and off load the tasks of centralized school infrastructure, and essentially use small local model for schools, lean, personable, competitive, and intermittent, then we could see actually more positive externalities like capping this problem with direct food services, especially since these hubs can focus their more human-to-human services in personal services for our children, like nutrition, but it is not limited to that.
 

Think of a school where you only go every other day,  to a small and local Dollar General model infrastructure. There is a school complex and it’s open all day rather than just 7:00-3:30. Someone is always getting paid to do face time face tutoring.  It’s local and the on site teachers get a rotation of students that they can more personally focus their time on, as online students get their pre-automated assignments and online services. It’s far easy to teach social skills and meet more face-to-face needs when that work is fully dedicated to that. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TheRedStranger said:

Healthy lunches for children expire and thus are less reusable as a tradable currency. Kentucky has had a problem for example with “pop trains” where people in Appalachia sell pop (which is a sugary teeth-rotting junk-food that should never be subsidized to begin with) in exchange for money. These stacks of sodas are bought with food stamps to turn this specific welfare stipend meant for families into liquid wealth, all for more ignominious purposes, like recreational drugs.

Excellent point; and Appalachia isn't the only region with this issue - the things people are allowed to buy using food stamps (at least in Kentucky; dunno about other states) is disgusting.

Quote

It’s far easy to teach social skills and meet more face-to-face needs when that work is fully dedicated to that. 

I agree. My mother is a retired teacher; according to her: the larger the class size, the more difficult it was to address the needs of student who need more assistance than the others. 30-40 students in a class was not unusual when she was working, btw. And a school complex like that could accommodate students who wouldn't do well in a completely online curriculum. Those with unreliable Internet service could complete assignments at a place in the complex (similar to a computer lab?). Furthermore, it could be used as a food distribution hub.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Excited to see what becomes of arcades when Augmented Reality really starts to take off. Arcades were rivaled by my console’s hardware in the states which caused their decline. People knew they could play all their favorite games at home, so why bother mom and dad driving to the arcade when you could ask for the game on Christmas and have it forever and whenever? That never really happened in Japan however, and I think it’s because they would update and give a more immersive experience constantly, and were also the only place you could really get close to a gambling experience due to their strict gambling laws. Buying prizes via pachinko was basically the only way to get around their frankly authoritarian laws on the matter. The free market there found a way however. 
 

Now in states, with the rise of dine and play joints like Dave and Busters and indoor amusement parks like Malibu Jacks, Gattitown, ect, I think there is enough to make arcades more prolifically marketable again especially as an element within a larger business. But new technology and the prizes-instead-of-gambling elements seems like they could really bring a boon to the old market. Consoles and PC’s may be able to give a form of VR experience but the infrastructure of an arcade will always beat that when it comes to immersion. Consumers want more than to walk blind around their cluttered apartments with goofy googles staples to their face, constantly tripping over wires and banging into walls, ruining the immersive experience. I think there is a future for home VR definitely, but more immersive Augmented Reality dark rides and arcade experiences will meet a demand for something they cannot really provide.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
On 6/16/2020 at 1:48 PM, MoKat said:

Interesting experiments on facial recognition systems:

Defeating Facial Recognition - Retia on Hak5

 

It's relief to see stuff like this. People seem to be singularly fascinated with this 20th century, Orwellian idea of surveillance, which is engendered in an archaic view of information theory. I am sure Mokat has taken Communication classes like I have, but for those who have not, Communication Theory once was thought to be merely a game of transmissions, like a radio tower to a radio. But modern theory sees communications as far more reciprocal.     Several, except maybe Generation Z, don't intuitively realize reciprocation, as the social dynamic, in which we grew up, as it pertains to technology, is largely shaped by the past century.  As technology improves and becomes cheap, so does its ubiquity and ability to counter specific uses over another. We no longer live in the age of mass media, but social media, and we are suffering the growing pains thereof. The net connects us all, and we no longer merely receive a few vectors with several transmissions, but prolifically transmit ourselves reciprocally with all we receive.  There is a weird, one-sided techno-determinism, thankfully that many thought-leaders are gladly starting to reject. We need to, desperately, or we won't innovate to resist such surveillance structures. We must wake up to the presupposition that media-tech is not centrally controlled and planned, but a tool all individuals can utilize to their own autonomous ends, for better or worse.

To build off of this:

___

Also, some other really interesting tech news - https://www.motor1.com/news/436339/mercedes-s-class-ar-hud/

I can't wait to play F-Zero X in real life.  XD *Crashes into a Starbucks.*

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Solar is not as green as you would think.

That heat and light pollution enough to cause animals burst into flame should be a cause of concern. What happens when that same heat hits some wayward persons in a close plane? 

The waste in production and recycling  is also a concern.
 

 Japan should have not wholly abandoned nuclear. It’s going to cause major long term incidents. 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...