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8 hours ago, Prince By-Tor said:

 If our sensors are getting this refined it means we will be able to accomplish a lot of detailed xenogeograpical survey work in the future. We can also make sure our most wayward probes could even establish some form of burst-transmission to these Radars. It sounds like some excellent insurance for our first scouts to the stars. Soon though,I hope it will be our own eyes to see the sun rise of a different star. 

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18 hours ago, TheRedStranger said:
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As for SpaceX's ambitious time frame, Hubbard said it should be feasible in principle, purely considering the company's transportation capabilities, but that technical questions remain.

"The key technical issue will be demonstrating life support in the Dragon for two people for the duration of the mission," he said. "With reasonable margins, the length of mission will be longer than planned for commercial crew. The key programmatic issue is level of risk: Is it understood? Has it been mitigated sufficiently?"

I hope the answer to both questions turns out to be "yes".

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  • 3 months later...

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/physicists-go-deep-in-search-of-dark-matter/?wt.mc=SA_Facebook-Share

my cousin is working with many other scientists and students from the South Dakota school of Mines on the Sanford project that operates in the former Homestake Gold Mine. Homestake is the same mine that my great-grandfather Loyal Lee Alexander worked and ultimately died there in a mining accident. 

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https://www.theverge.com/2016/9/28/13094642/hyperelastic-bone-graft-substance-unveiled

https://www.3dprintingprogress.com/articles/16028/how-to-regrow-long-bone-segments-using-3d-printing

It looks like the scaffaloding for bone regrowth is being honed to mass economical usage. Which brings to question the possibility of not merely replacing bone - but perhaps enhancing it the same way a carbon atom buffers the cubic lattice of molecules made of iron to make steel. If one were to add certain minerals and compounds into the mainframe of regrown bone, then we could see basically the development of a form of organic and subtle cybornetic, much unakin to the clunky steely implants of what may soon be considered retro-futuristic ideas in science fiction. In combination with a superior understanding of stem cells (including adult-cell reversal processes to avoid the moral quandary of frankly killing life to save life) and precision 3D printing of tissue, the question of replicating aged and damaged body parts without use of synthetic implants and prosthetics comes to question. Perhaps the future is actually a lot less chrome and a lot more flesh.

 

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The research in both articles sounds promising. It will be interesting to see how nicely the polymer plays when it's in a human body. 3D print scaffolds have been in use for a while, but faster healing would be great if it works.

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Pluto: Fart. Fart.

Charon: How can you stand it?

Pluto: I don't mind ^.^

Now that I've gotten that out of the way...

Interesting video; especially the part about the nitrogen ice.

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7 hours ago, MoKat said:

Pluto: Fart. Fart.

Charon: How can you stand it?

Pluto: I don't mind ^.^

Now that I've gotten that out of the way...

Interesting video; especially the part about the nitrogen ice.

Exactly, it basically has its own cryosphere the way we have a lithosphere. It's fascinating to imagine what xenometerology and xenogeology has in store. We already know that some planets possible rain glass...sideways...

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Found this recent Motherboard (Vice) article pertaining to channel 37:

Why Channel 37 Doesn’t Exist (And What It Has to Do With Aliens)

(actually, it has more to do with radio telescopes)

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The area around the 610 MHz band has, over the years, gained a reputation as being important to scientific research because of its placement in the context of two other frequencies important to radio astronomy, 410 MHz and 1.4 GHz.

 

As space and astronomy writer Bob King of Universe Today put it in 2013: “Without it, radio astronomers would lose a key window in an otherwise continuous radio view of the sky. Imagine a 3-panel bay window with the middle pane painted black. Who wants THAT?”

There was just one problem—the sudden, high popularity of television made the general bandwidth area where the telescope operated, 608-614 MHz, a bit of a hot commodity. It was literally the spot where channel 37 was supposed to go—and broadcasters wanted access to that channel.

 

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What Really Happened During the Texas Power Grid Outage?

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When disaster strikes, the flurry of political positioning and fingerpointing can make it difficult to understand what really happened. This video provides a summary of the facts of the 2021 Texas winter storm.

Okay, so it wasn't just wind power that failed...

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12 Biggest Discoveries of 2020 Got Hardly Any Attention

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxjIT6lkPCk

From Mars to dinosaurs...

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